facepiece MSA

MSA G1 Facepiece

MSA G1 Facepiece is lightweight and compact: No electronics needed

The MSA G1 Facepiece was designed without electronic components, to minimize weight, reduce your stress and fatigue and improve your overall performance level. This design also means that there are no electronic components on the outside of the facepiece that may result in snag and entanglement hazards.

Also, by eliminating costly electronic components, the price is reduced substantially, allowing personal-issue facepieces to be a cost effective measure. As an added bonus, the facepiece is equipped with cross-contamination prevention to reduce the spread of illness when facepieces are shared.

But MSA didn’t stop there. The MSA G1 SCBA is also equipped with a speaking diaphragm to increase speech clarity while off air.

The new G1 Facepiece is not only lightweight and compact with overall low profile design, it’s comfortable and built to last.

Taking the preferred design features of the Ultra Elite Facepiece, including wide field of view and comfortable, robust seal geometry, we’ve taken the MSA G1 SCBA to the next level with an open port to provide low breathing resistance, both on and off air.

The G1 Facepiece can help you to conserve energy for when you need it most. Learn more about MSA G1.

NFPA updates

NFPA Updates

Update on NFPA Standards, 2018 edition

We are providing an overview and current snapshot of the topics that are being discussed for inclusion in the 2018 edition of the NFPA 1981 and NFPA 1982 standards.

Some of the topics that are being discussed:

NFPA 1981

Second Stage Regulator Retention & Removal

  • This topic was discussed for the 2013 edition standard, but was not included at that time. It is now being incorporated into the 2018 edition standard.
  • This would include a strength of interface test between the face-piece and second stage regulator to ensure that the second stage regulator will not pull out of the face-piece lens.
  • The test would pull the regulator by the low pressure hose in 5 different directions at a force of 56.2 lbs.
  • This would also include a requirement for two distinct actions when removing the regulator.
    Example: Pull latch and rotate regulator

Pneumatic Data Logging
Minimums:

  • Initial Air Activation (pressure, date and time stamp)
  • Data Logging @ 30 second intervals (pressure, date and time stamp)
  • Data Logging of Pressure Milestones – 75 %, 50%, and 33% (EOSTI)
  • Breathing Rate @ 30 second intervals (minimum 5 LPM resolution)
  • HUD Deactivation (pressure, date and time stamp)
  • Retain 36 hours of data
  • Output data to CSV file
  • No requirement for temperature data log

Universal EBSS Fitting
The Task Group is working to develop a standardized EBSS fitting that would be universal between SCBA manufactures.

Minimums:

  • The EBSS shall have an operating range of 80-150 psi
  • The EBSS shall have male and female fittings that allow bidirectional airflow, with a check valve to prevent contamination from entering air circuit
  • The EBSS shall have a minimum hose length of 20 inches
  • The EBSS will be accessible using only one hand and able to be deployed by pulling in a single direction
  • The EBSS location will be readily visible and the pouch will be identified as being an EBSS

Communications

  • The Task Group is working with the Technical Committee (TC) on Electronic Safety Equipment (ESE) to develop joint performance requirements for hard-wired and wireless radio interface systems.
  • The Task Group has chosen Bluetooth protocol as the profile for wireless radio interface systems.
    • Wireless communications would include the connection from an in-mask microphone, remote speaker microphone, or voice amp to a Land Mobile Radio (LMR ).

Thermal Performance

  • There are currently no changes being reviewed for the 2018 edition as it relates to thermal performance of the face-piece lens.
  • The University of Illinois Fire Service Institute has received Federal grant
    funding and continues to conduct research in this area.

CBRN Certification

  • NIOSH is developing criteria for labs to be eligible to perform CBRN testing.
  • The criteria will be applied to the U.S. Army’s Edgewood Arsenal facility to help ensure future reliability, but it can also be applied to any other labs who might be interested in performing CBRN testing.

NFPA 1982

Transmitting RF PASS
The standard would include (2) new RF PASS tests to improve reliability:

  • Multi-hop
    • Wireless networks use two or more wireless hops to convey information from a source to a destination.
  • Multipath
    • Propagation phenomenon that results in radio signals reaching the receiving antenna by two or more paths.

Universal PASS Tone
The Task Group is changing the PASS tone to account for field reports of the sound not carrying as far

  • From a customer perspective, this could be translated as the volume not being as loud as pre-2013 Edition SCBA and/or not being able to discern direction and track the location of the sound

For more information visit NFPA website.

Spray Painter

The Importance of Paint Booth Inspection

The Importance of Paint Booth Inspection

The most common problems that are most likely going to face a spray booth include overspray, dripping, spilling or causing the unwanted accumulation of paints. Luckily, these issues can be perfectly mitigated and prevented through efficient paint booth inspection. Since a booth is comprised of various different parts which function differently, it would be great if the inspection is individualized to care for every part of the booth so that no malfunctions occur.

Easy Removal of Paint Accumulation

When paint accumulates in the booth, it is very tedious and daunting to remove. To avoid this from happening, make sure that you apply a protective booth coating during your inspection. Inspections allows you to see the possibility of paint accumulation. You can use the baffle coatings peelable booth coatings and water wash compounds. They all have unique features to help the booth in having paint accumulation, but their common function is to ensure that removal of paint accumulation on the booth is done easily.

Exhaust Stacks

If Fremont 59L is used or applied on the stacks, then a hand scraper can be used to easily remove the Exhaust stack overspray of the paint. For easy sludge disposal, the Fremont 59L and Fremont 60 can be applied on the walls of the booth. These two compounds can also be applied on the baffle plates. Exhaust consumes a lot of time to inspect, but it is important to ensure that you check everything on them to avoid future drawbacks.

Smooth Production Line Operation

For perfect production line spray painting, the parts to be sprayed are normally taken off or suspended from the hooks. They are then transported through the spray booth in such a way that any overspray that will miss the parts will paint the hooks. It would be easy to produce line operation by eliminating the paint from the hooks. A paint stripper additive will always reduce the stripping time.

Continued Operation without Downtime

Through maintenance tasks like booth floor stripping, skimming and tank cleaning, the parts of the booth will be made efficient and functioning at a quick speed. Stripping of the booth floors needs to be done using an ideal stripper that would react with the overspray paint for its easy removal. The stripper should be able to retain its functionality so that it can be used in the next maintenance session or stripping session. The nozzles should remain unclogged. To check for any sludge accumulation, remove the cap on the main header, and you will see everything. The solution that is contained in the reservoir tank should be of right chemical composition to avoid sludge from circulating in the whole system.

Request a monthly inspection and an annual test of all paint booth systems. Fire and Safety company is here to help.

respirator fitting

Respiratory Protection – The Role of Fit Testing

What a Fit Test Pass Truly Entails

Now, the truth is that fit testing, especially when it comes to tight-fitting respiratory face pieces is something which has been used for quite a while now. However, there are yet quite a lot of widespread misconceptions as well as misunderstanding regardless what a fit test pass truly entails. Different aspects would usually generate research papers, and there are a few different ones which are dedicated to this issue. In any case, the below will attempt to explain certain key considerations and to describe its relevance to the proper control of exposure throughout the usage of protective respiratory devices.

Why Fit Testing?

The purpose of this particular respirator fit testing is actually designated to verify that the actual selected make as well as model and also the size of the face piece accommodates the facial characteristics of the individual perfectly. That’s the main purpose, and that’s what needs to be taken into account.

Passing the fit test, however, doesn’t really guarantee that every time the person dons the face piece the adequate fit is going to get achieved. In fact, it identifies that this particular face piece has the actual potential to fit the facial characteristics, provided the wearer makes the necessary adjustments on his own.

Things to Consider

In the United States, the NIOSH is responsible for the testing and the certification of the Respiratory Protective Device (RPD). Total Inward Leakage measurement (TIL), on the other hand, hasn’t been a part of the certification process at all. The actual evaluation of fit has relied on testing which is individual as well as different mandated by the OSHA checking procedures. However, understanding the complications that this could deliver, the NIOSH are already implementing TIL testing as part of the certification process which is designated to evaluate the performance of RPD under lab conditions.

Safety importance

The Importance of Lockout Tag out Training

The unfortunate truth is that too many employees are injured or killed because they failed to understand whether a machine or the power to the machine was turned on or off. The best measure that you can possibly take in order to prevent this from happening is locking out / tag out training.  The estimations indicate that approximately about 120 lives per year are being saved and more than 50 injuries are being prevented. These are methods of protecting employees by making sure that all of the machines are turned off prior to operating on them or if they are to work around.

If you don’t have an employed lock out tag out program at your work site, then you run the risk of the machines starting back up unexpectedly and without warning. This is because they have this particular tendency because of the energy which was stored and it wasn’t correctly released afterwards. Or it could also happen when someone goes ahead to start the machine without first checking whether everything is safe enough to do so.

The Hazardous Energy Sources

Now, there are a few different types of energy sources which are considered hazardous. This is according to the standard of the lock out tag out program which requires that such sources are isolated and also rendered inoperative duly and appropriately. Some of these sources include:

  • Thermal
  • Hydraulic
  • Mechanical
  • Chemical
  • Gravitational
  • Pneumatic

These particular sources could be active currents, or they could be stored in a capacitor. What is more, a failure to properly recognize all of the energy sources which could impose dangers and hazards to the worker is particularly harmful. This is the main intention behind the lock out tag out training.

Basic Steps

There are a few steps that need to be taken into account when it comes to loc out tag out training, and they include planning, communication, and neutralization of the power right there at the source and locking out all of the power sources.

Only when all of the machines have been prepared, and the workers are deemed to be in a safe condition can the power be turned back on in order to commence the working process. This is something particularly important and, as you can see for yourself, it could also be life-saving. With this being said, following common and properly established practices is critical for the overall safety of your employees.

fire sprinkler

Types of Fire Systems and Installations

Different Types of Most Reliable Fire Protection System

Fires are some of the most destructive accidents in any establishment, once it has spread, it is difficult to contain which often leads to massive loss of property and sometimes lives. To counter the effects of fire or to take care of it in a timely manner one is advised to install a well done and maintained fire sprinkler system that will activate whenever irregular high temperatures are detected in any one room. Fire sprinklers are known to completely handle and take care of sudden fires 97% of the time hence protecting property and lives. This is why you need professionals to install and test any of the different types of sprinklers in your home or establishment.

Wet Systems

This is the most common and effective way of getting rid of any fire that starts. The sprinklers are linked to high-pressure pipes containing water that are activated to release water whenever any detection of fire is made. This can be either abnormally high temperatures or smoke that may cause fire. The sprinklers immediately go off letting out water that potentially gets rid of the fire danger.

Dry Sprinkler Systems

In these types of sprinklers, pressurized nitrogen is filled in the pipes and not water. This is usually done in cases where the pipes are expected to be exposed to very low temperatures that would normally cause the water to freeze. The air is made to prevent water from entering the pipe unless a fire breaks when the sprinklers will be open letting out the air thus allowing water out of the sprinklers to take care of the fire.

Fire Pumps

Sometimes the high pressure needed to push out water to stop a fire cannot be reached; this is why it is important to have a fire pump that is powered electrically or using diesel. The pump draws water from another water supply point directing it to the pipes and out the sprinklers hence putting out the fire.

Sprinkler Heads

These are the ones with the heat detection sensors that allow the sprinkler to be activated whenever there is a fire, and they allow the water to be released through them. They are the most important component in stopping fires as they are the key to every other step.

Stand Pipes

These are the many pipes that are interconnected to each other which come from a major source of water which allow firefighters to get access to water required to stop a huge fire that the sprinklers were not able to completely take out.

These are the most important components that help in having great fire sprinklers systems just in case a fire starts in your premises and before the fire fighters get to the scene of the fire. You need to ensure that all of these are properly installed. Fire and Safety Company inspects and repairs both wet & dry systems. We can help you get rid of the fire risk and of fire property destruction.

Firefighters

The Importance of Fire Radios

Have you thought how important radio is to a firefighter and how to protect it

Providing a portable radio to each crew member entering a building may seem like a pretty basic requirement in this day and age. However, firefighters who enter a building without portable radios are out of touch with what else is occurring on the fireground. They cannot hear radio reports that may warn them that other crews have encountered dangerous conditions. They cannot heat that occupants, for whom they are searching. have been accounted for, or that indicate that fire conditions have changed. Most importantly, they cannot receive orders from the IC, including an order to withdraw.

The portable radio has become so fundamental to our operations that many departments have taken the approach of issuing a portable radio to all on-duty members, not just to company officers. Some firefighters carry radios in their jacket chest pocket. Some carry it in a pocket on the sleeve. Officers often hold the radio in their hand the entire time as a way to force them to maintain a position behind the crew to direct and supervise.

Regardless of where the radio is carried, it needs to be protected from extreme heat. The radio is resistant to normal wear but is not designed for extreme heat. Bunker gear can protect the radio.

Carrying the radio under the gear using a radio strap like this Boston Leather Radio Strap or in the inside pocket, will provide more thermal protection. The radio mic can be threaded through the space between the collar and the zipper area. If the radio has no mic, it will have to be kept in an external pocket.

Also, it is good for the firefighter to go through Personal Protective Equipment training to know how to use and protect all the protective equipment one owns. Fire & Safety Company can assess your workplace, help you write a plan and train your employees in the proper use of Personal Protective Equipment.  Call today for more information.

 

Firefighters in a group

Firefighter Jargon

Firefighters use their own terminology and slang words

People that have firefighter friends and hear them talk about work related situations often have no clue what they talk about. Many of them use terms most people don’t understand. Not the big, fancy words, but slang terms used by only firefighters. Did you know you never refer to the hose when talking to a firefighter?? Well, there are entire dictionaries and glossaries devoted to firefighting terms and language so we can’t give you all of them, but here are 7 Firefighter slang words that you might have heard, but didn’t know the meaning of:

1. Stretchin’

When there is a working fire, firefighters tell central that they are stretchin’ on whatever it is they are going to work on. For example, when firefighters pull up to a house fire, they would say, “Engine 30 stretchin’ on a two flat going throughout.” This means that firefighters responded to the fire and stretched their lines to fight it.

2. Pipe

That’s the hose. It is also sometimes called the ‘Line’ and is pretty much NEVER called a hose.

3. Pipeman

This term is typically used only by inner city firefighters. Pipeman is usually the person on the engine. This is the person carrying the pipe into the fire to extinguish it.

4. Jake

In the Midwest the term Jake means that someone is a terrible firefighter. On the East Coast, it means that person is a good firefighter. No one knows why the same word in different areas means completely opposite things.

5. Deckie

Firefighters on the back of the engine are called a deckie.

6. Truckie

A firefighter assigned to a ladder company and working on the ladder truck.

7. Redline

A red, 1-inch diameter, hose line that puts out 60gpm. All engines and trucks have them. It is used on car fires, trash fires, and even sometimes on dwelling fires. It’s on a reel so it is deployed and put away very quickly.

There are literally hundreds more and many different locations have their own slang terms. If you are really interested here is a great online resource for you: http://www.fireserviceinfo.com/glossary.html

Fire Engine

Home Fire Safety & Prevention Tips

The most effective way to protect yourself and your home from fire is to identify and remove fire hazards.

Most of home fire deaths occur in homes with no working smoke alarms. During a home fire, working smoke alarms and a fire escape plan that has been practiced regularly can save lives. Read how your family can prevent home fire.

Steps you can take now to stay safe

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home – inside bedrooms and outside sleeping areas.
  • Test smoke alarms every month and replace the batteries at least once a year. This can be done manually by pressing a test button or using Smoke Detector Tester Spray.
  • Keep items that can catch on fire at least three feet away from anything that gets hot, such as space heaters.
  • Stay in the kitchen when frying, grilling or broiling food. If you leave the kitchen for even a short period of time, turn off the stove.
  • Talk to children regularly about the dangers of fire, matches and lighters and keep them out of reach.

Create a home escape plan

  • Have two ways out of each room.
  • Know to crawl low to the floor when escaping to avoid toxic smoke.
  • Know that once you’re out, stay out.
  • Know where to meet after the escape.
  • Meeting place should be near the front of your home, so firefighters know you are out.
  • Practice your fire escape plan.

Remember to GET OUT, STAY OUT and CALL 9-1-1 or your local emergency phone number.

  • If closed doors or handles are warm, use your second way out. Never open doors that are warm to the touch. Crawl low under smoke.
  • Go to your outside meeting place and then call for help.
  • If smoke, heat or flames block your exit routes, stay in the room with doors closed. Place a wet towel under the door and call the fire department or 9-1-1. Open a window and wave a brightly colored cloth or flashlight to signal for help.

Print this Home Safety Checklist to better prepare.

MSA G1 SCBA

MSA Introduces New G1 SCBA

The MSA G1 SCBA is changing the game again with the new Integrated Thermal Imaging Camera provides EVERY firefighter the ability to see in dark and smoke filled environments, aiding in the speed and effectiveness of your operation from the initial 360, to working the fire, overhaul and rescue.